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TOPIC: Fried Chicken?

Fried Chicken? 6 months 2 weeks ago #3106

Found these in east central Alberta under poplar and Caragana. Lots of dead wood. Fried chicken?

Also, would it be a good idea to dehydrate some or what they do better sautéed and frozen?

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Last Edit: 6 months 2 weeks ago by Barb Shworak.
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Fried Chicken? 6 months 2 weeks ago #3113

  • Martin Osis
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These look like some sort of tricholoma. The edible tricholomas are pretty distinctive, the rest kinda look like these. But in may just be your photos. Typical Chickens are clustered with longer twisting stalks. I see single mushrooms with short stout stalks.
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Fried Chicken? 6 months 2 weeks ago #3115

Here are more photos of the same mushrooms-

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Last Edit: 6 months 4 days ago by Barb Shworak.
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Fried Chicken? 6 months 2 weeks ago #3117

  • Martin Osis
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As I have commented before, I find the genus lyophyllum very difficult. They resemble tricholomas and clitocybes so much and these have many poisonous mushrooms. Lyophyllum have some microscopic characteristics that can more positively confirm them so if you have access to a microscope it is easier to get to know the group.

When choosing to eat them or not is a very personal decision. When I do, the ones I choose clearly need to be growing on wood, be clustered and have the longer somewhat twisted stalks. Can single growing mushroom be lyophyllum, certain can but I am not confident enough to make such a determination for myself let alone for you.

I hope some other folks weigh in and can help with a different perspective.
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Fried Chicken? 6 months 2 weeks ago #3120

Thanks, Martin. I really appreciate your help.

These were clustered together, on wood that was under the leaves, and every one had its stalk joined to a base with other mushrooms coming from it. Some were clustered together higher up.

I do have a microscope - do you think you'd be able to help me with what to look for?
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Fried Chicken? 6 months 2 weeks ago #3121

Hi Toby,

The microscopic characters here are only OK unless you have a chemical called acetocarmine. When a piece of gill is heated in acetocarmine, its basidia should develop dark purple things inside of them called siderophyllous granules; this is a distinguishing feature of the genus Lyophyllum (see www.flickr.com/photos/39538316@N07/17334818185). Aside from that, if it is Lyophyllum decastes the spores should be very globose (circular), whereas most related species will have spores that are longer than wide. If you can measure them they should be about 4-6 um in diameter according to mushroomexpert.com.

When I'm picking L. decastes for the table I usually just look for the growth in BIG connected clusters in somewhat disturbed areas, the grey to brown cap contrasting with everything else white, firm flesh throughout, and just barely decurrent white-spored gills. The gills can be notched according to the references like in your pics, but I've rarely found them that way.

Mike
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